Tuesday, July 04, 2017

6 Minute Egg Sandwich

INGREDIENTS
2 slices soft bread (alternatively, 2 slices whole grain bread, taken from freezer where you store it to keep it from molding, popped in the toaster for a few minutes to thaw and barely slightly toast)
1 egg (large, cage free, organic, local, vegetarian fed or any combination of those)
1 T. (approx.) Hellman's light mayonnaise
2 dashes Lowery's salt
Butter for the pan

Additionals:  greens (such as a few leaves of romaine), slice sharp cheddar, avocado spread

Melt enough butter to frost the bottom of the pan.
When hot, crack egg into pan and break yoke.
When egg is cooked on one side, flip egg with a delicate sliding motion.
Meanwhile, spread mayo on one slice of bread.
Lay greens on mayo if adding greens.
Lay cheese on the other slice of bread if using cheese or spread with avocado if using that.
Slide egg onto cheese.
Sprinkle egg with Lowery salt.

Place the other half of the sandwich on top. Push down slightly and wrap in a paper towel or cloth napkin to serve.

Sunday, July 02, 2017

The Wedding Manager

I got a call from my friend's wife, to have coffee. This was weird as I have met her all of two times, and both times with her boyfriend in tow. This time, it's just us.

We meet at a Starbucks. I'm nervous. I'm married, without kids, but tend to hang out with guys more than girls. This leads to a strange assumption that there is something more than friendship going on. Well, maybe sometimes it isn't so strange, but by and large, it's completely harmless. Still... I'm nervous meeting her.

It's three o'clock on a Thursday. After we get our drinks (she gets a Grande Non-fat Caramel Frappuchino w/o whip. I get a medium roast with 2%.) and sit down, she avails me of my fears, but adds a heaping helping of new ones.

"I bet you're wondering what this is all about, hu? Well, I want you to be Mike's Wedding Manager."

"Oh!" I was pretty sure they were affianced, even though they hadn't really made a big deal out of it. It would be the second marriage for both of them. "What's a wedding manager?"

I had worked for a number of years as a wedding coordinator, which is different than a wedding planner, but the wedding manager was something new.

She sighed. "I have a confession to make." Oh boy.

"I'm actually quite wealthy. And, it turns out, we need to have three weddings. One here, one at our retreat environment in Arizona, and one in Australia where my Dad's from."

"Oh!" I exclaimed again. "I see," but didn't.

"We worked it out, and there will probably be 400 people at each party." I assumed 'we' did not mean her and Mike. "I haven't told Mike yet. He's going to freak out. I need you to manage him. I also need you to help with the communication."

"Like to the guests?"

"Yes. And my family, and my Da's friends. There are some, oh I guess you could call the contingencies concerning the program we all use to sync our calendars. Mike does know a thing about that, but he hates it, so I thought, since you two used to work together and I'm pretty sure your knowledge is on par with his, you could take over that part."

I wasn't exactly clear on what she was inferring, but I nodded. I liked Mike, I liked her I knew my stuff (although maybe not on par with him the technology part, at least I could add my planning prowess) and over everything, I was a first child, and therefore, a pleaser. I wanted to help.

If only I had known....

Adventures with Hermit Crabs

I ended up adopting two hermit crabs and am currently doing research into their life and habitat needs. Some links I have found useful so far:

Their tank is 30 gallons and I found that out here:

http://www.firsttankguide.net/calculator.php

Their heater:

https://zoomed.com/reptitherm-under-tank-heater-u-t-h/


Mobile Life

It's mornings like this - Sunday, the freaking chipping sparrow wakes me early - that I contemplate leaving my smart phone in my bedroom all day. 



Audio clip from https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/SOUND/SPECIES/620A.mp3



That is to say. with fewer distractions in my head, I start listing off the things I would be using my phone for and how I am completing those tasks instead (kinda like those quit smoking commercials about re-learning how to do ordinary things without cigarettes).

The first thing this year, over the past few months at least, has been "check to see if Brewers are still above .500 (i.e. more wins than losses), and still in first place in the National League Central division". This I know from listening to the game last night and hearing that the Cubs are still behind, so no need to check there (but if I did, I would click the ESPN App, click MLB, scroll to Brewers vs. XX and then click "standings")  

I would then check to see the chance of rain using my Weather Kitty App - it is usually not the most accurate, but it is the most filled with cute kitties, and kitties are my stand-by feel-good injection so that is a plus for me. But I was pretty sure there is only a slight chance of rain, and it looks like it when I peek outside, so no need to check that.

So now I am to the point of, ok, grab a cup of coffee and... then what? I have just purchased some ratchet straps and pool noodles to create a car rack for my paddleboard, to enable me the freedom to take it to the lake on my own (vs. tying it to having access to the van or getting a hitch). So I decide to concentrate on figuring out the ratchets. I briefly consider looking at YouTube for information on the ratchets, but instead trust that somewhere in the package there are instructions (although I cannot see them) and lo and behold, there are. They seem pretty straight forward, dispite me being rather confounded by their physics. I would say that at some point, if they did not exist, I would probably have come up with carabiner clips but someone else would have had to come up with ratchets as they are not intuitive to me.

So here I am - to the point of going out to put the car rack on. I've watered the lawn, watered the garden, and let the cats out, as well as checking on the hermit crabs, the fish, and my 3rd shift husband's schedule (works tonight).

The phone is still in my bedroom.


Saturday, May 06, 2017

Henry Rollins is imperfect

Just read this article published on HR bday:
http://www.laweekly.com/music/henry-rollins-i-liked-it-so-much-in-redondo-beach-that-i-had-to-get-out-7955920
A few choice word-morsels:
" I fear comfort. I fear falling prey to it. I fear things stopping because I lost the courage to potentially fail trying something new."
"The older I get, the more suspicious I am of many things that are considered traditional."
And he goes on to describe how things in the US are currently leaning traditional and how things have gotta change.
- posted from my phone

Friday, January 20, 2017

Day 1 of First 100

I woke with a headache.
Not a great start. Coffee will make it go away, but I also had one of the worst nights of sleep I've had in a long while. Too bad. Time waits for no one.

From now through April 30, 2017 I'm tracking my first 100 days of political advocacy, but also, the first 100 days of the next 4 years. I hypothesis that this is going to be tough. I wager I do talk to all 5 of my representatives, weigh in on policy regarding my two big issues - environmental protection/green energy and birth control access, and make connections with allies to help retake the political football from our opponents past this first short burst of activism.

This may seem counter intuitive to those who want to win - showing my plans like this. But while I do believe politics needs to be conducted as if it were a game, I also believe that rules need to be agreed on and followed, goals need to be set, and if possible, plans laid out in such a way that they can be tracked and recreated and tested again if they do indeed reach the intended outcomes.

My research for this came from reading a lot of articles, some planning equipment like Alex Vermeer's 8760 hours (you can find it on line), and talking to thoughtful friends and relatives about the hazy path to the future. I thank them all.

Now - this initial post on this, my old reliable personal blog, isn't indicative of how or where my political exploits will be documented. Check out my twitter handle: goatmaiden or my newly minted political blog: pirategoat.com or the Pirate Goat Facebook page for more.

I do have other goals not related to advocacy which include understanding a little more written and spoken Japanese and to create and share more fantastic creations, so you can watch for more tracking of those type of things here.

Monday, July 18, 2016

Wisconsin Fish Boil: A Recipe

(Crosspost on For Health's Sake)

4 small red potatoes, scrubbed
2 small white onions, pealed
2 whole Lake Michigan whitefish, cleaned and heads removed
Salt, pepper, rye bread slices, good coleslaw
--
Boil a pot of salted water. Drop in potato and onion and cook until just tender. Add whitefish, cut into hunks. Boil until fish is flaky. Drain. Serve potato and onion in a bowl with lots of butter. Lay fish on a plate with rye bread and butter. The butter is important. Salt and pepper to taste





Sunday, July 17, 2016

Beer Review: Hop Nosh Tangerine

Hop Nosh Tangerine, from Uinta Brewery out of Utah, had little or no tangerine taste to speak of. It was a pretty tangerine color, with an average head of creamy off-white foam. The body was sparkling but the aroma heavy with hints of resin and leaves (my companion noted "bug spray").
Drinking it was challenging, with a sticky mix of malt and hops, lively carbonation, and an unpleasant astringent finish. Overall I gave it 3 out of 5 but do not think I would drink it again.

AVB = 7.3%


Wednesday, March 30, 2016

A They Might Be Giants Top 10 Factual Countdown

1. Both John's have released their own non-TMBG albums; and they're pretty good: They Might Be Giant's (TMBG) two original members are John Flansburgh and John Linnell. Their side projects have included an album called "State Songs" (John L. - here's a fan video of "Maine"). Mono Puff is John F.'s (Flans, Flansy) band - check out the album "Unsupervised,"  including the song "I hit my head".
2. John Linnell was voted the 9th most beautiful person by People Magazine online voters: This is on his Wikipedia page but bears noting: in a People magazine online poll "The Most Beautiful People of 1998" – John Linnell finished ninth. He used this incident as a chance to write an opp ed about online voting in which he notes, "(i)f my experience is any guide, though, it appears there are still a few bugs to be worked out before you'll be able to elect the next President while sitting at home in your underwear."

3. Prolific and with staying power: TMBG has created 19 studio albums in the past 34 years, but the full discography is over 40.
4. Opening bands: Some of the more famous opening bands for TMBG have included OK Go and Jonathan Coulton.
5. Fun for the whole family: They Might Be Giant released "No!" in 2002, an album aimed at kids. After that, they played a number of all-ages concerts and released a "Here Come..." series over the next few years:
- "Here Come the ABCs"
- "Here Come the 123s"
- "Here Comes Science"
On the "Here Come's Science" album, there is a cover song from the 1950s called "Why Does The Sun Shine" - which it turned out contained a number of inaccuracies. They released a follow-up correction song and called it "Why does the sun really shine?"
They released another family friendly album in late 2015 called "Why?".
6. But some of their stuff is not suitable for children: The album after "Here Come's Science" was a decidedly adult affair. "Join Us" featured a monster truck style hearse on the cover and had songs with names like "Old Pine Box" and "When Will You Die". In a countdown of top 10 They Might Be Giants songs on StereoGum, the first track, "Can't Keep Johnny Down", was noted as “... fucking grim. It shouldn’t work as a fast power-pop song.”

7. They collapsed a stage in 1992 while playing polka music in Wisconsin: Here is audio of the event. And here is an article about the theater it happened at which just went through a multi-year renovation:
Modjeska Theatre in Milwaukee, WI.
8. They covered "Bills, Bills, Bills": They have participated twice in the AV Club’s Underground concert series, where bands come in and must choose from a list of songs to cover. Here are links to their versions of Destiny's Child's "Bills, Bills, Bills" and Chumbawumba's "Tubthumping".
And here is a link to another band covering them.
9. Did you know The Daily Show W/ John Steward theme song is called “Dog on Fire”: and oh yea, was performed by TMBG (written by Bob Mould).
10. You can download their March 2016 album Phone Power for free: Totally. Go here and “pay what you want” - It is set up for “pay what we want” ($9) but $0 is completely acceptable amount of dollars to pay for the download.
BONUS! The end of the tour?? In 2016 during what was said to be their final tour for a while (possibly until 2018), they sold out most if not all of their venues. In Denver, CO, they sold out their first venue and moved to a second larger location, before having to cancel due to a March snowstorm. That concert was rescheduled for July.
Here they are playing their first of two encores in Milwaukee:


And the band handing out stickers after the concert:


Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Eating through the Carr Valley Cheese list

I’ve never met the man, but Sid Cook seems to be a real nut, and I mean that in a good way. Master cheese maker for Carr Valley, his experimentation tends to the fantastical: “let’s mix up a bunch of milk and make it into cheese. Let’s add cranberries and cure it in olive oil – why not? Let’s put it in a cave and see what happens! And hell, while we’re at it, why not smoke it!?”
I can’t fault him his process, as he has won more top national and international awards than any other cheese maker in North America, according to the Carr Valley website.  Nor can I deny the fact that I am a big enough cheese fiend (I prefer it, vice-wise, over chocolate, wine, candy, or chips) that, when a few years ago a Carr Valley cheese store opened up just blocks from my home with possibly hundreds of different types of cheese to try, I decided to attempt to try them all.
I’m close.

(click for larger version)
They have a huge selection of cheddar as well as their artisan weirdo cheeses, and best of all, they offer many “adorable cheese orphans” in packages small enough that one doesn’t feel like a glutton for tasting hundreds of cheeses. And lucky for me, they publish a veritable tome of all the choices in the form of their brochure.
So here it is – my chosen favorite Carr Valley cheeses, as well as brief tasting notes for all of the cheeses that were listed in this version of the brochure (this is the third one I have acquired, having to transfer my scribbles each time). In the Other’s section, there may be cheeses not created by Carr Valley (I don’t think Dancing goat is, for instance) but I included those I tasted.
BEST OF THE BEST
Big Mutton Button – The first cheese I remember absolutely loving, so much so, I had to mark it down so I wouldn’t forget. While I am more of a goat fan, I do like a good sheep cheese. This is yummy and not sharp, rather earthy. To quote the brochure “Made in 3 lb. wheels, hard but unpressed cheese made similar to Brick Cheese. The flavor is bright and sweet with lemony tartness and will stand with any red wine. Took 2nd place at 2013 us championship cheese contest, 2nd place at 2014 American Cheese Society (ACS) competition, Bronze metal at 2011 world cheese awards.”
Benedictine – Yummy, creamy but curd-y cheese that is not too sour. “Cellar cured and hand rubbed for 12 weeks, has a creamy, intense flavored washed-rind finish. 2nd place at 2010 ACS competition and 3rd at World Championship contest”
Mobay – Just delicious. “Sid’s take on a French Morbier. It features a layer of sheep milk cheese and a layer of goat milk cheese separated by a layer of grape vine ash. Taste each layer separately and then together for three different flavor profiles in one great cheese. Took 1st place at the 2007 AVS competition, 2nd at the 2011 US championship cheese competition.”
Cave aged Marissa – Yum! Creamy, good cheese flavor. “This natural-rind variety gets its complex, sweet and slightly rambunctious flavors from open air cave aging. Best of show grand master award, 2005 Wisconsin state fair, 2nd best of show and 1 place at 2008 ACS competition. 1st place and 2nd best of show at 2011 ACS competition, 1st place 2012 and 3rd place 2014 world championship cheese contest. 1st place 2013 US championship cheese contest.”
Sweet Vanilla Cardona – The second cheese I remember having to make a note of. Pretty much tastes exactly likes what it says. If ever anyone doubted cheese with dessert, they need to taste this. “A delicious and unique sweet, vanilla goat milk cheese with hints of caramel, coconut, and nutmeg. 1st pave 2011 US championship cheese contest, 3rd place 2011 ACS competition.
Beer cheddar – OK so nothing super fancy about this cheese, but damn, some times you just want really good aged cheddar, and this one has a hint of beer to boot. Would make a killer beer cheese soup, tastes delicious on any salty sandwich. Smooth and sharp at the same time.
Garlic cheddar – fantastic cheddar, with the addition of a fragrant, savory garlic. Not bitter but full flavored. Really good.
Gurneys cheddar – Great midway cheese – not too sharp, not too mild. Pretty white and yellow, salty, good body without being rubbery or too crumbly. Great for everyday.
Smoked rope cheese – I was so surprised I liked this! I’m not a big overall fan of smoked cheese – which can range from overpoweringly bacon-y to “this is really gilding the lily”. This was salty and creamy and the smoke did not overwhelm but instead added a comforting toasty campfire taste.
…and the rest!
CHEDDARS
Squeaky fresh cheddar curds – good but not the best I’ve ever had (and I live in Wisconsin, so I’ve had my fair share). Seemed lacking in salt, and the texture was too rubbery.
Fresh day old cheddar – just like eating a block of curd. Rubbery.
Baby cheddar – I liked the baby better than the curd. It was squeaky, salty and sweet.
Mild cheddar – Ok. A little sharper than expected, soft.
Medium cheddar – Very commercial tasting.
Yearling – Good, but baby is better.
1 year aged cheddar – Is there a difference between Yearling and 1 year? I don’t know and didn’t taste them at the same time. This is good, with a long finish and pretty cheddary.
2 year aged cheddar – OK but not great.
3 year aged cheddar – Softer, sharper. Tastes old.
4 year aged cheddar – Actually tasted a little alcoholic. Starting to get sharper and less cheese taste.
6 year aged cheddar – Strong and creamy.
10 year aged cheddar – Good. Dark and strong. Very crumbly and has those little calcium nibbles.
Autumn harvest (seasonal) – Good solid cheese. Easy to eat.
Cranberry hickory nut cheddar (seasonal) – OK. Sorta clashes, but the cheddar was nice.
Horseradish cheddar – pretty strong. Would have to taste again to remember what I meant.
Irish valley cheddar (seasonal) – Plain, not strong enough.
Organic cheddar – Too parmesan-y and not cheddary enough.
Pinconning cheddar – if you think that all of these cheddars are the same with just different labels, try this one. And then let me know if you like it. I found it to be almost medicinal.
Wildflower cheddar (seasonal) – Very nice.
Winter solstice cheddar (seasonal) – I may have the wool pulled over my eyes, and these are probably all the same cheese, but out of the seasonal cheddars, I like this one the best. It’s a good solid cheddar with a nice milky taste.

SHEEP
Montan - Mild, flaky, tasty. Very hard.
Ba Ba blue -Super creamy, very blue and very soft. Almost catches in your throat with pungentness.
Black sheep truffle – Rather sour and dusty with a milky tone.
Marisa – Very good with yummy nibbles.
Smoked Marisa – Warm and sheepy.
Virgin pine native sheep blue – Really not very blue at all. Strong.

COW
Apple smoked cheddar – Not as smoky as some. Rich and good.
Apple smoked garlic cheddar – Smelly! Cheddary and acidic.
Bread cheese – Buttery, toasty but a little plasticy.
Cave aged cheddar – Sharp and musty, deep. Not crumbly. “Wisconsin’s only cave aged cheddar.”
Cranberry chipotle cheddar – Exactly what it says. White cheddar.
Crema kasa – Dull. A little sharp. Soft.
Glacier wildfire - Not too blue. Not too soft. Kinda hot. Pretty tasty.
Maunster – Effervescent. Sharp.
Virgin-pine native blue – Musty. Really un-blue! Nutty.
Glacier blue – Cow. Very strong and salty.

GOAT
Bandaged Billy – Cave aged, musty and goaty. Did not like. May have had too small a sample that contained too much rind.
Baraboo blue – Sweet, not very moldy. Like an aged feta.
Smoked Billy blue – Smooth, somewhat goaty. The smoking was not necessary – too complex to make sense.
Black goat truffle – Mild and interesting.
Cardona – Mild, smooth, very light goatness.
Aged cardona – A touch of must. Lots of nibbles. Strong.
Cave aged cardona – Good mustiness, soft and goaty.
Cocoa cardona – OK. Gouda-like, strong.
Goat cheddar – So mild, and hardly goaty.
River bend goat – Smelly. Sweet.
Snow white goat cheddar – Moldy.

MIXED MILK CHEESE
Airco – Like the smoked skin on a skin-on hotdog.
Bessie’s blend – Soft, parmesan-y.
Carnaria – Strong and musty.
Casa bolo mellage – Firm, creamy, flavorful.
Cave aged mellage – Flavors of mushroom. Salty and creamy.
Gran carnaria – Lemony. Grassy. Creamy.
Menage – Spanish. Easy to eat. Gouda-y.
Shepard blend – Soft, sharp, sour.

OTHER
Colby – I’m very picky towards my Colby. I like it crumbly, mild, milky and salty. Texture is too moist with this one, and not salty enough.
Monterrey jack – Pretty sharp, very soft.
Veggie jack – Super oniony and soft.
Ba ba blue smoked – Soft and salty. Sausage cheese.
Bread cheese – chipotle – Like a smoky spicy eraser.
Chevre au lait – Gouda soft, strong. Good. Not goaty.
Cured brick - Tastes (and smells) like you shouldn't eat it.
Double Gloucester – Like a sharp, soft cheddar.
Edam – Good and snacky.
Feta cow – Salty, cheddary. Not very feta.
Feta sheep – Too milky.
Feta goat – Fresh, salty, slightly goaty. Cheesy.
Fondella – Wine cheese, smooth.
Fontina - Jackish. Smooth.
French fontina – Quite smooth.
Glacier penta crema – Cow, creamy, salty.
Mammoth cheddar – Delicious. Crunchy bits.
Mellage – Crumbly, sharp, Gouda.
Monastery – Creamy, sharp, nibbly.
Native sheep – Sharp, crumbly, almost mealy.
Native sheep smoked – OK. Wiener casing, creamy.
Organic baby Swiss – Moist. Very few holes. Not too sharp.
Port salue – Soft, creamy, sharp.
River bend sheep – Sour, socky yet interesting.
Sid Bahl baby smoked – Warm and smoky.
Sid Bahl baby Swiss – Mild and a little off.
Tom's Swiss - Crumbly. Not Swiss like but good.
Swiss - Normal! Full bodied.
Fresh goat – v. good!
Aged Swiss 2yr + - Pungent taste, good Swiss flavor.
Asiago – Dry, strong, good, sour.
Baby Swiss loaves – Smooth and flavorful.
Medium brick – No taste.
Butter kase – Very creamy, mild, mild, Velvetaesque.
Chocolate cheese – Fudge with nuts.
Dancing goat Gouda – Very fresh milk taste.
Dancing sheep – Very smooth, cheddary.
Mozzarella whips – Good.
Provolone – Pungent, soft.
Romano – A good, hard cheese.
Rope cheese plain – Good.
Wunderbar – Rubbery, mild, good amount of salt.



I have yet to taste the following (some of these I have not seen in the store, some are not made by Carr Valley but are listed in their brochure, whereas others I may have tasted, but forgot to write them down, so they didn’t count!): Cow – Carr Valley Blue, Hot Pepper Jack, Smoked Hot Pepper Jack. General – sharp cheddar, x sharp cheddar, 5 year cheddar, 8 year cheddar, apple smoked goat cheddar, cranberry hickory nut cheddar, hickory nut cheddar, smoked cheddar, garlic bread cheese, jalapeno bread cheese, cheddar (like, really? just plain cheddar? ok...), smoked crema casa, smoked fontina, gouda, smoked gouda, aged gouda, havarti, Aged Marisa, Swedish farmer, beer kase, mild brick, caraway brick, brie, co-jack, farmer low fat, Gruyere, Limburger, mozzarella, Parmesan 3 year, smoked provolone, Romano, string and Swiss lace.

Monday, March 21, 2016

Snowidow Report - Tyrol Basin, Mt Horeb, WI

Who: The Who is me, Sarah B.
But in wintertime, I am the happy Snowidow, free as a bird, or whatever animal finds happiness in the chilly white wonderland, to cozy up into any chalet bar, content to slurp hot cocoa (or something harder) and let my computer dine on free wi-fi while my significant other cuts through the slopes of fresh powder, or whatever.
This is the introductory posting of the Snowidow Report. I hope to visit all the major ski hills in Wisconsin and report out not on the condition of the hills, nor necessarily the level of expertise needed to challenge the black diamond. No, my focus will be on what I find important; namely, the resort bar and amenities. So lets get the inauguration going!
NOTE: These reports will be dated, and amended as I revisit or gain new information. Please let me know of any requests, errors, or updates, thanks!
What: Tyrol Basin
Tyrol Basin is a relatively small but reliable ski resort in the rural farmlands of Wisconsin. It consists of 16 runs over 30 acres and a chalet located in a renovated barn from the 1900s.

The hill stretches out from a base elevation of 870 feet to a top elevation of 1,130ft (per Wikipedia). It has one of the top 5 terrain Parks in the Midwest according to Snowboarding Transworld. There is no attached resort for hotels, but it’s not far from Mt Horeb, Verona, or Madison, WI. They host a number of ski and snowboard races throughout the season. Like most places in Wisconsin, it is family friendly (and they serve beer).

Where: 3487 Bohn Road, Mount Horeb (Troll capital of the world) WI
Google map
When: 3/6/2015 – at the end of the very loooong cooooold season that also brought very little snow to the Midwest.
The details:
Cafe-
“Our cafe offers cooked to order burgers, hotdogs, loaded nachos, breakfast and much more!” – from website
Little cafeteria downstairs from the bar.
Bar-
In a nutshell: “The Tyrol bar is home to the Tyrol Bloody Mary.  We also offer beer buckets, plenty of Wisconsin craft beers and our Tyrol Punch.” – from website
This is the bar with the wall of skis.

We came on a Friday afternoon – not quite in time for the late night rate that really draws ‘em in, but not at the peak rate either. I found myself a seat next to the line of other like-minded brunettes and logged into the wi-fi.

There is all but zero cell reception, and the wi-fi was also weak and somewhat spotty, but I was able to watch some videos and listen to music.
The beer selection was pretty good, and I ordered the Winter Skal on nitro. http://www.craftbeer.com/craft-beer-muses/good-beer-gas-nitro-beers-explained Wasn’t quite sure how that was gonna go, but it was as smooth as silk.

At the bar, I saw a tally list on a chalkboard labeled “Wall of Fall” - the bartender had been keeping track of how many skiers, with their preposterous Frankenstein boots, ate it on the hardwood floor. Apparently he eventually convinced those in charge of such things to purchase some safety rugs.
I counted 1 TV, 1 juke box and 1 pinball machine (South Park).

Overall Snowidow score: 3 of 5 - dandy use of a day off







Sunday, February 07, 2016

Exploding kittens and goats

(crosspost at http://goatmaiden.com/ )
So perhaps you have heard of a certain card game Kickstarter that has gone balistic.
I have enjoyed reading this crowd-funding-that-could story from a marketing and fundraising viewpoint. The people involved (two designers and a famous comic artist) were very smart to focus on very few but very clear perks (donate $20 bux to make this card game, and you get a copy of this card game.) They may have set their initial sights too low ($10,000) and didn't plan out enough "stretch goals" (in case, like it did, the campaign surpassed it's goal.)
  • Apparently, they reached their initial goal in 8 minutes.
  • Then, over 120,000 donors broke a Kickstarter record.
  • And they have now made over $5M.
I have also enjoyed watching from a goat supporter's standpoint. Goats have been in it to win it from the beginning, with an all-seeing Goat wizard able to help you, and later, the release of a goat butt that lets you see into the future.
(Granted, that is a mountain goat, not a true goat, but who's counting.)
The group was taking suggestions for other cards on Facebook recently, and I added a few caprine ideas. Who wants to bet if there will be more goaty magic to come?

Tuesday, February 02, 2016

Super-GOAT-Bowl!

Goats take over the Superbowl.
(crosspost at http://goatmaiden.com/ )
First off, in the Alternative Offering of Puppybowl, five goats served as the cheerleaders.
From Puppybowl Facebook
According to this article, "...four of the baby goats; Charlie, Murphy, Speckles and Sammy, were
born and raised at Molasses Hill Farm here (in New Jersey). The other baby goat, Cookie,
was born at the Guenther Farm, also in Clinton Township."
Then, the main reason people watch the actual game, as most people know, is for the commercials, and goats were to be had there as well:
Also, T Mobile's subteranian petting zoo:
Anyone see any other goat sightings? Share them!




Sunday, January 17, 2016

2015 - Year of the Goat - or is it?

(crosspost at http://goatmaiden.com/ )
Greetings fellow followers and friends of all things capra. We are gearing up for a great year, with plenty more posts and hopefully a huge influx of mainstream goat articles. Already, I have spotted some goat-themed ads and goats appearing more and more often in mainstream media and gotten some great tips from fans. Keep it up!
For now, though, I have a question, which was brought up by this photograph and caption in this month's Country Living -- is it the year of the SHEEP (boo! no!) or is it the year of the GOAT? (Yaaa! Yeah!!!)
This is of course in reference to the Lunar or Chinese New Year, which happens Thursday, February 19, 2015 this year (it moves around due to the nature of the calendar it is based on, which is not the Gregorian calendar.)
Wikipedia states it is the Year of the Goat but elsewhere mentions it could be the Year of the Ram or the Year of the Sheep (shudder.)
So what do you think?